University of Miami School of Law CourseLink Course Description - Online System
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Spring 2021
LAW179  A  INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAWYERING & ADVOCACY

Course Description
This seminar considers major issues in international human rights law and advocacy from the perspective of the advocate. It is designed to introduce students to the promotion and protection of human rights through context-driven advocacy mechanisms and strategies. The seminar will provide an introduction to the history of human rights principles and movements, the development of international human rights norms, and an overview of the international, regional and national institutions that develop, interpret and enforce these norms. The remainder of the seminar will evaluate human rights advocacy tools and strategies applied in various political, social and economic contexts. Through case studies and simulated human rights research and advocacy projects, students will develop the skills to conduct international human rights work, including: performing situational assessments; designing and executing field-work and fact-gathering; report writing; interviewing witnesses and victims of abuses; assessing various litigation and non-litigation strategies; conducting effective legal research using diverse sources; developing cross-cultural and context-driven analysis and advocacy skills; and learning to effectively and realistically evaluate achievements and challenges. Class discussions and readings will expose students to critical perspectives on the international human rights regime, current research methodologies and technologies used to monitor and promote human rights, and the ethical challenges of international human rights work. Select classes will examine domestic analogues to international human rights advocacy – namely law and public policy advocacy at the national, state, and local levels – and consider new directions in human rights and social justice advocacy in the Trump era. Grading will be based on class participation, simulations and a series of short assignments that will require students to conduct research, develop strategic advocacy plans, and draft documents aimed at advancing particular human rights positions. Students wishing to satisfy their writing requirements may do so though this seminar, by writing a longer research paper.

Course Schedule
Dates Day Time Room
01-25-2021 - 03-08-2021   M  10:10 AM-11:50 AM DL
03-15-2021 - 03-15-2021   M  12:30 PM-1:50 PM DL
03-22-2021 - 04-08-2021   M  10:10 AM-11:50 AM DL
04-12-2021 - 04-12-2021   M  9:25 AM-10:45 AM DL
04-19-2021 - 04-27-2021   M  10:10 AM-11:50 AM DL

Course Frequency
This course is likely a one time offering

Course Information

Credits: 2
Pass/Fail Option: No
Prerequisite: Recommended: International Human Rights Law
Grading: Graded
Method of Evaluation: Class participation. Students will complete a final project paper of their selection.
Graduation Requirements Fulfilled By Course:
General
Writing Requirement
Special Attributes: None
Course Delivery:
Online (all synchronous)
Special Restrictions: This course is open to 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs. It is a required course for students enrolled in the Human Rights Clinic (HRC) but is open to non-HRC students as well.
Law Track(s):
International & Comparative Law - Specialized
Social Justice - Specialized
Bar Subject(s):
NEW YORK SKILLS
Concentration(s): None
Course Book(s): TBD/None      
First Class Assignment(s):
  • Assignment: Class 1: Jan. 25 Introductions, The Universal Declaration on Human Rights in Context Readings: 1. Read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) (available here: http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/). Please become generally familiar with the rights contained in this foundational human rights document. Assignment: Identify one story in the news that you believe implicates one or more of the human rights identified in the UDHR. Who are the alleged victim(s)? Who are the alleged perpetrator(s)? Are any governments named in the story? Are any corporations or public/private institutions/groups named in the story? Which right(s) in the UDHR do you think are implicated? Does the story use the words “human rights”? Class Description: In this class, we will review the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and explore its application to current events.   

    Universal Declaration on Human Rights.pdf
  • Assignment: Hello students! Hopefully everyone now has access to the course and first assignment on Blackboard. Just in case, the first assignment is also below. There is no book assigned to this course, and we are using Blackboard, not TWEN. The syllabus will be posted tomorrow, but here is all you need for tomorrow's class. Class 1: Jan. 25 Introductions, The Universal Declaration on Human Rights in Context Readings: 1. Read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) (available here: http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/). Please become generally familiar with the rights contained in this foundational human rights document. Assignment: Identify one story in the news that you believe implicates one or more of the human rights identified in the UDHR. Who are the alleged victim(s)? Who are the alleged perpetrator(s)? Are any governments named in the story? Are any corporations or public/private institutions/groups named in the story? Which right(s) in the UDHR do you think are implicated? Does the story use the words “human rights”? Class Description: In this class, we will review the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and explore its application to current events. You should access the Zoom portal for this class through Blackboard, but in case you are not able to do so, please use: https://miami.zoom.us/j/97101136957   

 
Professor(s)

BETTINGER-LOPEZ, CAROLINE


Biography
Contact Information:
Email: clopez@law.miami.edu
Phone: (305)284-5923
Office: E256